Ash Plume Streams from Mt. Etna, Sicily

Ash Plume Streams from Mt. Etna, Sicily

When this southward-looking photograph was taken by the Expedition 2 crew aboard the International Space Station, the city of Catania (in shadow, ~25 km SSE of the volcano) was covered by a layer of ash and Fontanarossa International Airport was closed. On that day an ash cloud was reported to have reached a maximum height of ~5.2 km. Plumes from two sources are visible here—a dense, darker mass from one of the three summit craters and a lighter, lower one.

The record of historical volcanism of Mt. Etna is one of the longest in the world, dating back to 1500 BC. Two styles of activity are typical: explosive eruptions, sometimes with minor lava flows, from the summit craters and flank eruptions from fissures.

Addittional sources of information:
Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program
Italy's Volcanoes

Images & Animations

File

File Dimensions

  • 540x359
  • JPEG 61 KB
  • 3060x2035
  • JPEG 2 MB

Metadata

  • Data Date:

    July 22, 2001
  • Visualization Date:

    August 4, 2001
  • Sensor(s):

    ISS - Digital Camera
Share
NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration